Print bookPrint book

Week 2 - Properties of Mixtures and Fluids Using the Particle Model

Week 2 - Properties of Mixtures and Fluids Using the Particle Model

Site: AB Course Sharing Hub
Course: Science 8 LearnNet
Book: Week 2 - Properties of Mixtures and Fluids Using the Particle Model
Printed by: Guest user
Date: Sunday, 20 October 2019, 2:10 PM

1 WHMIS

whmis symbol

 


Lesson 5: WHMIS

Textbook Readings

Science Focus 8
Pages 25 and 481
or
Science in Action 8
Page
s 9 to 12

In this lesson, you will be introduced to the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS). This system is designed to warn all Canadians from hazardous materials in the workplace. You will also compare the WHMIS symbols to those commonly found on hazardous materials in your home.

 

© 2001-2002 www.arttoday.com

Background Information

Open the WHMIS Symbol Chart.


WHMIS is a short form for Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System. WHMIS is a Canada-wide system designed to ensure that all employers obtain the information that they need to inform and train their employees about hazardous materials used in their workplace. Information is provided by means of product labels, material safety data sheets (MSDS) and worker education programs.

  • WHMIS labels provide the essential information that a person needs in order to handle a particular product safely.

  • MSDSs provide basic technical information about a product's physical characteristics and its hazardous properties.

  • Worker Education is that part of the program that ensures workers are able to apply the information to protect the personal health and safety.

At this point in your school career, you likely be dealing with materials that are safe to handle. However, you should become familiar with the following WHMIS symbols. As you enter the workforce it is very important that you understand how to handle hazardous materials safely.


Online Grade 8 Science Support
http://learn.argyll.epsb.ca/Science/Sci8/AOC/

 

 

Activities

Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System
The WHMIS system groups hazardous materials into six classes or categories based on the hazard that they represent. Each hazard has it is own symbol. In this activity you will investigate the symbols used in the workplace to identify hazardous or controlled substances.

Materials:
- WHMIS Symbol Chart
- photographs of various business and industries
- access to the Internet or other resources

1. Draw a data chart, similar to the one shown below, in your notebook.

Business or Industry
Hazardous Chemical
WHMIS Symbol
farming anhydrous ammonia
 
 
   
 
 

2. Click here to open the WHMIS Symbol Chart.

3. Study the photographs depicting people in different businesses or industries.

© 2001-2002 www.arttoday.com

Farming

© 2001-2002 www.arttoday.com

Gas Station Attendant

© 2001-2002 www.arttoday.com

Scientist

© 2001-2002 www.arttoday.com

Pharmacist

© 2001-2002 www.arttoday.com

Welder

© 2001-2002 www.arttoday.com

Food Preparation

4. Use prior knowledge, the Internet, or other resources to identify one hazardous or controlled substances that might be associated with each business or industry. Record this substance in your data chart.

5. Use the WHMIS Symbol Chart to predict the symbol that might be associated with this substance. Draw the standard WHMIS symbol on your data chart.

6. Play the WHMIS Game (bottom of page). Match the WHMIS symbol to the appropriate description. The game has 4 levels. Answer the question correctly at the end of a level to advance to the next one. Review the symbols before you start:

WHMIS Symbols

 
 

Exercise 2.1

Check Your Understanding

 


Copyright © 2003 Alberta Learning
Created through the Alberta Online Consortium Content Development Initiative 3.

2 Pure Substances, Mixtures and Solutions


Lesson 6: Pure Substances, Mixtures and Solutions

© 2001-2002 www.arttoday.com

Textbook Readings

ScienceFocus 8
Pages 13 to 15
or
Science in Action 8
Page
s 19 to 23

Pure substances, mixtures and solutions are all important types of substances. Read on to learn more.

© 2001-2002 www.arttoday.com

Background Information

In our experience with our everyday world, we see many different kinds of substances. Let's consider three substances that we may see often - a glass of distilled water, muddy river water and clear ocean water. These are all forms of water, but likely only one of them is one you would like to drink.

Experiment Time: Chromatography

When you have completed your notes, do the experiment given in the link to a "Yes Magazine" article below. This experiment shows how the separation method of chromatography can be used in crime (forensic) labs.

Paper Chromatography

 


Copyright © 2003 Alberta Learning
Created through the Alberta Online Consortium Content Development Initiative 3.

3 Pure Substances, Mixtures and Solutions (continued)


Lesson 7: Pure Substances, Mixtures and Solutions (continued)

Textbook Readings

ScienceFocus 8
Pages 24-35
or
Science in Action 8
Page
17-21, 24-29, 34-35

In the previous lesson, you learned that clear ocean water is a solution. One of the dissolved materials in ocean water is salt. You might begin to wonder how much salt can dissolve in water. Does temperature matter? Does everything dissolve in water? These and many more questions will be answered as you examine closely what solutions are all about.

 

© 2001-2002 www.arttoday.com

Background Information

As you read your text did you notice that there are many new terms. Be sure to define all of the following terms:

solute

solvent

solubility

concentration

unsaturated solution

agitation

soluble

aqueous

distillation

saturated solution

dissolve

crystallization

evaporation

saturation point

supersaturated solution

 

Experiment Time:


Read very carefully the descriptions of the factors that affect how quickly a solute dissolves in a solvent. Read the explanations of how the particle model of matter explains this effect.


In this lesson, you are asked to do one type of calculation - that is how to calculate the concentration of a solution in g/mL. An example follows:

You have dissolved 5 grams of sugar in your 250 mL cup of coffee. What is the concentration (in g/mL) of sugar in the coffee?

To solve this type of question, simply divide the mass of the solute by the volume of the solvent.

5 g sugar/ 250 mL coffee = 0.02 g/mL

Thus the concentration of sugar is 0.02 g/mL

Exercise 2.3
 
 

Copyright © 2003 Alberta Learning
Created through the Alberta Online Consortium Content Development Initiative 3.

4 Introduction to Viscosity


Lesson 8: Introduction to Viscosity

No Textbook

Readings

for this lesson

 

A measure of the tendency to flow is viscosity. Viscosity is a concept that is roughly equivalent to the term "thickness". Water flows readily because it is thin (or less viscous), syrup flows more slowly because it is thicker then water (or more viscous) and tar is even slower because it is very viscous. Basically a high viscosity means that it flows (or pours) slowly.

© 2001-2002 www.arttoday.com

Background Information

The Particle Theory

According to the particle theory, all matter is composed of smaller particles which are always moving (See lesson 1 for a review of the particle theory). These particles have attractions for each other. It is the attractions between molecules that causes viscosity.

Shauna Burke © Alberta Learning
Shauna Burke © Alberta Learning
Shauna Burke © Alberta Learning
Strong attraction = high viscosity
less attraction = less viscous
low attraction = low viscosity

This force or attraction is called friction. When a fluid pours, the force of gravity pulls down but the force of friction works against gravity. The forces of friction between the particles in some fluids are stronger then in other fluids. If the force of attraction is very strong, the liquid will pour slowly compare to a liquid with weaker intermolecular attraction.

Activity

Experiment Time:

Aim: To study the viscosity of liquids

Materials:

-molasses
-water
-two clear measuring cups (or one and wash it in-between the experiments)
-two bowls
-watch or clock with a second hand

Method:

1. Measure exactly 125 ml (or 1/2 cup) of molasses into a clear measuring cup.

2. Slowly pour the molasses into the bowl. Record the time required to pour the molasses.

3. Measure exactly 125 ml (or 1/2 cup) of water into a clear measuring cup.

4. Slowly pour the molasses into the bowl. Record the time required to pour the water.

Observations:

Prepare a table to record your results.

Exercise 2.4

 

 

Copyright © 2003 Alberta Learning
Created through the Alberta Online Consortium Content Development Initiative 3.

.

5 Unit 1 Mix and Flow of Matter Section 2 Notes

Section 2 Notes

6 Unit 1 Section 2 Quiz

Unit 1 Section 2 Quiz

You will have two opportunities to write this section quiz. This quiz consists of 10 questions. Use the results from your 1st attempt to help you prepare for your second attempt. Your best score will be taken as your assessment mark. You have 10 minutes to complete this multiple choice quiz.


 Click the icon to go to the quiz.